products Water Sedimentation Plant

Sedimentation Water Plant

 

Sedimentation tank, also called settling tank or clarifier, component of a modern system of water supply or wastewater treatment. A sedimentation tank allows suspended particles to settle out of water or wastewater as it flows slowly through the tank, thereby providing some degree of purification. A layer of accumulated solids, called sludge, forms at the bottom of the tank and is periodically removed. In drinking-water treatment, coagulants are added to the water prior to sedimentation in order to facilitate the settling process, which is followed by filtration and other treatment steps. In modern sewage treatment, primary sedimentation must be followed by secondary treatment (e.g., trickling filter or activated sludge) to increase purification efficiencies. Sedimentation is usually preceded by treatment using bar screens and grit chambers to remove large objects and coarse solids.

The type and extent of treatment required to obtain potable water depends on the quality of the source. The better the quality, the less treatment is needed. Surface water usually needs more extensive treatment than does groundwater, because most streams, rivers, and lakes are polluted to some extent. Even in areas remote from human populations, surface water contains suspended silt, organic material, decaying vegetation, and microbes from animal wastes. Groundwater, on the other hand, is usually free of microbes and suspended solids because of natural filtration as the water moves through soil, though it often contains relatively high concentrations of dissolved minerals from its direct contact with soil and rock.

Water is treated in a variety of physical and chemical methods. Treatment of surface water begins with intake screens to prevent fish and debris from entering the plant and damaging pumps and other components. Conventional treatment of water primarily involves clarification and disinfection. Clarification removes most of the turbidity, making the water crystal clear. Disinfection, usually the final step in the treatment of drinking water, destroys pathogenic microbes. Groundwater does not often need clarification, but it should be disinfected as a precaution to protect public health. In addition to clarification and disinfection, the processes of softening, aeration, carbon adsorption, and fluoridation may be used for certain public water sources. Desalination processes are used in areas where freshwater supplies are not readily available.